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Other events in Dublin

Beautiful Minds

Past event - 2019
20 May 18:30 - 21:00
The Mercantile, 28, Dame Street,
Dublin Dublin 2
Sold Out!
Join us at the Merchantile  Pub in the city centre as we unravel the mysteries of Epilepsy, the most common neurological condition in Ireland. In this event we will explore current research towards weathering the storms of the brain.

Zooming in on brain cells

Dr. Janosch Heller (Marie Skłodowska-Curie Fellow at RCSI FutureNeuro, Department of Physiology and Medical Physics)
@JanoschHeller
Biomedical research relies heavily on microscopy and other imaging systems. However, some important target molecules and processes are just too small to be imaged with conventional techniques. Dr Heller will give a brief history of the use and developments of microscopy in Neuroscience; from Santiago Ramón y Cajal and Camillo Golgi, to electron microscopy and to the novel ‘super-resolution’ techniques. These new methods will help researchers to study the intricate events that govern our thoughts and memories and that can go wrong in diseases such as epilepsy.
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Dublin Brain Bank - Supporting Research into Neurological Disorders

Jennifer Lorigan (Brain Bank Coordinator, Dublin Brain Bank, Beaumont Hospital)
Neurological disorders are one of the leading causes of disability worldwide. Dublin Brain Bank offers the opportunity to contribute to research into neurological disorders in a tangible way, by donating brain tissue to medical science. By studying brain tissue from patients with neurological disorders, as well as healthy patients, researchers can improve our understanding of these conditions, leading to improved diagnostic tools, more effective treatments, and ultimately a better quality of life for patients.
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Why should we do research in the field of Epilepsy?

Dr. Lara Costard (Postdoctoral Researcher RCSI Tissue Engineering Research Group, Anatomy Department, RCSI. )
Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder affecting more than 50 million people worldwide. The mechanisms by which the brain turns into a state in that develops spontaneous, unprovoked seizures from an otherwise normal brain function are not understood. A high proportion of epilepsy patients do not become seizure-free with currently available antiepileptic drugs. Also treatment with these drugs is only symptomatic - it suppresses seizures but doesn’t cure the epileptic brain. The drugs can also have several side-effects. Therefore there is an urgent need to develop new treatment options.
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MicroRNA and epilepsy: tiny molecules with big potential

Dr. Gareth Morris (Postdoctoral Marie Sklodowska-Curie Research Fellow at RCSI FutureNeuro, Department of Physiology and Medical Physics)
@GarethMorris5
"Around one third of epilepsy patients can’t be treated with existing drugs. Epilepsy researchers are always on the lookout for novel and creative treatment strategies to overcome
this. Our lab focuses on microRNAs - tiny regulatory molecules which become disrupted in epilepsy. By manipulating these molecules we can prevent seizures and reduce the development of epilepsy. Overall microRNAs are new and exciting targets for the treatment of epilepsy."
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Other events in The Mercantile

28, Dame Street, Dublin, Dublin 2 28, Dame Street, Dublin, Dublin 2
21 May
Dublin
Sold Out!
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Peering into Space

Atoms 05 Spiral Galaxy
28, Dame Street, Dublin, Dublin 2 28, Dame Street, Dublin, Dublin 2
22 May
Dublin
Sold Out!
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Crucial Communication

Mind 22 Cartoon Brain